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Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

Quantico, VA
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During a Full Systems Test, the Defense Media Activity Marines get the Electric Litter Carrier from all sides. This very early concept is being used to explore the potential benefit of a powered litter.
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The Autonomous Internally Transportable Vehicle, also known as AITV. The vehicle can be operated in a variety of autonomous and semi-autonomous modes.
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The Ultra Heavy-Lift Amphibious Connector (UHAC) is a 4/10 scale concept demonstrator that weighs in at a "lean" 38 tons and is just under 18" tall. The full scale craft, not yet built, is projected to hit 20 knots at sea and be capable of carrying 3 tanks.
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Up and over. The UHAC had no trouble making the transition here.
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The medical officer on duty at the Battalion Aid Station watches the video feed of a simulated injury during a Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory limited technical assessment. The Tempus Pro, portable vital signs monitor being used at the point of injury is able to transmit video, pictures, and vital signs to the next level of care while also enabling the medical providers to communicate through both voice and text.
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Sgt. Danny Pereira (left) and HM2 Kristofer Baskett (center) continue to monitor the status of the injured Sailor and treat his simulated wounds. Baskett is able to adjust treatment based on direction from the medical provider at the Battalion Aid Station. The Tempus Pro allows the on scene medical provider to communicate through voice or text to the next level of care like a Battalion Aid Station.
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While HM2 Kristofer Baskett (left) assesses the Sailor’s simulated wounds, Sgt. Danny Pereira (right) monitors his vital signs with the Tempus Pro portable vital signs monitor. Pereira was able to transmit the vital signs as well as pictures and video of the injuries back to the Battalion Aid Station through the Tempus Pro.
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Brigadier General Kevin Killea, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory Commanding General, is seen here leading the mule-like robot known as the Legged Squad Support System (LS3) through the woods at Fort Devens, Mass.   The general, wearing  a special pack fitted with thick black bands that the robot is programmed to identify and track, led LS3 through the woods over uneven and sometimes tricky terrain strewn with fallen logs, thick underbrush, and wet leaves sometimes hiding holes and other unseen hazards.  The Warfighting Lab is working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Boston Dynamics to explore concepts that can potentially lighten the load of Marine units.  LS3, still in the early stages of development, is capable of carrying 400 pounds of gear and traversing terrain that wheeled and tracked vehicles cannot.  The Limited Technical Assessment included putting the robot under the control of Marines from the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment at Camp Pendleton, Calif including animal packers from the Mountain Warfare Training Center in California.
(Official USMC Photo by Kyle J. O. Olson)
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Brigadier General Kevin Killea, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory Commanding General, listens as Kevin Blankespoor, Vice President of Controls and Autonomy at Boston Dynamics explains how the Legged Squad Support System (LS3) works. The Warfighting Lab is working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Boston Dynamics to explore concepts that can potentially lighten the load of Marine units.  LS3, still in the early stages of development, is capable carrying 400 pounds of gear and traversing terrain that wheeled and tracked vehicles cannot.  The Limited Technical Assessment included putting the robot under the control of Marines from the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment at Camp Pendleton, Calif including animal packers from the Mountain Warfare Training Center in California.
(Official USMC Photo by Kyle J. O. Olson)
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PFC Marcus Beedle leads the mule-like robot known as the Legged Squad Support System on a patrol through open terrain at Fort Devens Mass.  Beedle, working with other Marines from 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment learned how to control LS3 and work it into basic formations and maneuvers during the limited technical assessment at Fort Devens.  This was the first time Marines have been given control of LS3 since the Warfighting Lab began working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the system's developer Boston Dynamics.  The Warfighting Lab is working with the DARPA and Boston Dynamics to explore concepts that can potentially lighten the load of Marine units.  LS3, still in the early stages of development, is capable of carrying 400 pounds of gear and traversing terrain that wheeled and tracked vehicles cannot.
(Official USMC Photo by Kyle J. O. Olson)
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BGen Mark R. Wise, (right) Commanding General, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory prepares to pin the Bronze Star Medal on Col. John H. Lister (left), the Lab’s Senior Liaison Officer for Counter-Improvised Explosive Devices at the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization. Col. Lister was awarded the Bronze Star for his actions while assigned to the I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) in Afghanistan.
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“The landscape going forward is ever changing for our Marines who continue to deploy in harms way and I see it as our job to stay in front of those changes,” BGen (Sel) Kevin J. Killea, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory Commanding General and Director of the Marine Corps Futures Directorate.
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BGen Mark R. Wise (left) passes the Marine Corps Warfighting Lab’s colors to MGySgt. Larry E. Deyott as he relinquishes command of the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory at a change of command ceremony held at the Gray Research Center aboard Marine Corps Base Quantico.
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Lieutenant General John A Toolan Jr., Commanding General, I Marine Expeditionary Force listens as the USMC Metering and Monitoring System (M&M) is explained during ExFOB 2013 at MCAGCC Twentynine Palms, Calif. The current M&M prototype is designed to allow Marines to meter, monitor, record and display electrical, fuel, and environmental data. The system is intended to enable Marines to manage energy use more efficiently and effectively
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Staff Sergeant Humberto Magana and Corporal Victor Lopez, from Camp Pendleton, Calif., are using a Vector 21B Laser Range Finder and Defense Advanced GPS Receiver to determine coordinates for a close air support target during the first day of the Enhanced Marine Air Ground Task Force Operations Limited Objective Experiment 3. This portion of the exercise focuses on using current Marine Corps systems and methods for fire support.
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Corporal Charles Stephens with 1st Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division from Camp Pendleton, Calif. uses a Vector 21B laser rangefinder to identify potential targets during the Enhanced Marine Air Ground Task Force Operations Limited Objective Experiment 3 at Army National Guard Post, Camp Roberts, Calif. On his lap is the Strikelink Military Ruggedized Tablet, used to request fire support missions.
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